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Author Topic: They steal your money and then throw you in jail when you complain  (Read 1550 times)
IWCCTTT
Sr. Member
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Posts: 486


« on: July 03, 2018, 02:31:58 PM »

A man was jailed today for complaining that the bozos at Georgetown County Kraft Union had locked his account and would not give him access to his money. Then the bank called the city cops and said they felt threatened and had him locked up! Sounds a lot like when a private citizen said BULLSHIT in the police station and got locked up. Georgetown=BULLSHIT.
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Tom Rubillo
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Posts: 47


« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2018, 10:54:02 AM »

There should be a security video depicting what happened.  There should also be computer records of accounts that reveal activity in the individual's account and, if there was some dispute over its accuracy, the basis or a foundation helping to explain the whys and wherefores of the underlying that dispute.  If there are independent witnesses (other customers) to what was said and by whom to carry the matter outside of a "he said, she said" battle, the police, the Solicitor and/or a trial jury will be able to get to the bottom of this matter.  If, as the first poster contends, that the accused is the victim of an over-reaction arising from a dispute over the history of an account he maintains at the credit union, one of two things will happen.  Either the charges against him will be dismissed or he will be found not guilty at the criminal trial.  If either of those two things happen, a civil lawsuit for false arrest, defamation and the like is sure to follow.  If all that comes to pass don't be surprised if the credit union's liability insurer tries to throw the credit union under the bus based on an "exclusion" in its policy denying coverage for "intentional acts," leaving the credit union to pay any judgment or settlement out of its own funds.  Meanwhile, what a boon to economic development creating, as this dispute inevitably does, full employment for attorneys.  Stay tuned.
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concernedperson
Hero Member
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Posts: 557


« Reply #2 on: July 04, 2018, 12:08:41 PM »

Mr Tom you of all people know how this town works. Just like we never saw a public ending to the false case brought by the city against the poor man who returned Jack(boot) Scovile (scoundrel) his campaign signs, we shall never see or hear how this case ends. People will work it out and it will disappear quietly as usual.
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Tom Rubillo
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Posts: 47


« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2018, 09:57:22 AM »

Time heals all wounds and wounds all heels.  Its passage also tells many tales.  In this case, as in every other case, time will  tell.  Time will  tell.  Patience. .
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Tom Rubillo
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Posts: 47


« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2018, 06:18:25 PM »

IWCCTTT See the posting immediately above.  Legal actions may not happen fast enough to satisfy the immediate urges, impulses or desires of outside observers, but they happen.  Before anything happens in civil court, underlying charges in criminal court have to be resolved first.  That takes time.  The same is true for civil litigation that follows.  Since the case against the City will be defended by the Municipal Association's Risk Management Fund (which is funded entirely with public money), both the ultimate outcome and the cost of defense will be subject to disclosure pursuant to the SC Freedom of Information Act on request.  Just monitor the filings at the Clerk of Court's office (available on line) and make the request when an order of dismissal is entered in the civil case against the city.  You'll find out what you want to know that way.  As far as the Credit Union is concerned, as far as you'll get will be to able to learn the outcome of the criminal charges by monitoring the court's record at the Clerk's office.  You'll also be able to track any civil litigation filed there.  But because the Credit Union would be defended by a private insurance company, it will be much harder to track the outcome.  The FOIA does not apply to private companies but only governmental entities.  But members of the Credit Union may have a corporate right to probe any outcome once an order of dismissal of any civil action is filed.  Meanwhile, though, there's nothing unique about this as far as "how things work" in Georgetown.  It is just how they work generally all across the state in particular and in the American legal system in general.  But have faith.  That, and be patient.  Time heals all wounds and wounds all heals. 
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Lee Padgett
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Posts: 2086


« Reply #5 on: July 10, 2018, 07:03:54 AM »

Looking at this guy's rap sheet with multiple charges of shoplifting, assault and battery, burglary etc I will defer to Kraft Credit Union on this one.
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"The death of objectivism and small government can be attributed to emotional politics." Liberty Laura
Tom Rubillo
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Posts: 47


« Reply #6 on: July 10, 2018, 10:17:52 AM »

Okay, Lee.  You've just completed a step  in the sort of investigation to be done by the police and the Solicitor's office when making a decision whether to prosecute  or not.  That sort of background check, coupled with review of the video and bank records of any credit union accounts in the name of the defendant will guide those decisions.  But, given the number of incidents that  occur and all the other business to be attended to by both the police and the Solicitor's office, it will all take time.  Once a decision about whether to indict the defendant or not is  made, meetings  with defense counsel, disclosure of any  "exculpatory" evidence and the like will follow before any criminal case would appear on the trial roster in General Sessions Court.  The outcome there will go  a long way toward deciding what happens next.  But the point here, just as in my posting  about the case involving "littering" and campaign signs, is that it all takes time to play itself out.  That straightforward reality is not evidence  of any kind that the system is rigged or that the fix is in or that there's no justice or to advance some conspiracy theory or another. It  is just the day-to-day reality of the often difficult work involved in making sure that we remain a community, state and nation controlled by an orderly system of laws and a fair and even-handed process for its administration and  enforcement, both civilly and criminally.  It is about about maintaining the rule of law  against the impulses and urges of crowd rule or despotic, iron handed and iron fisted authoritarianism.  The nice thing about it all, though, is that, with exceptions (of course), it works pretty well and, as I summarized the situation before, "Time  heals all wounds and wounds all heels." 
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Lee Padgett
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Posts: 2086


« Reply #7 on: July 10, 2018, 05:57:47 PM »

Agree 100%. We have no way of knowing if he has overdrawn his account or if the IRS or other agency has frozen it. Stay tuned.
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"The death of objectivism and small government can be attributed to emotional politics." Liberty Laura
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