Author Topic: Tim Tilley. Rich, white, arrogant  (Read 1699 times)

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JW

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Tim Tilley. Rich, white, arrogant
« on: November 27, 2020, 02:02:06 PM »
So I read the Coastal Observer today and i see Tim Tilley attack Georgetown and say Nobody's going to live in Georgetown. He said Georgetown is not attactive and is trashy? You know what Tim Tilley? Maybe your trashy business at the airport is the problem.

The project got support from Tim Tilley, a former chairman of the Economic Development Alliance and owner of a manufacturing firm in Georgetown. He said there is a need for the rental housing that Graycliff proposes.

ďNobodyís going to live in Georgetown. Iím sorry, but itís not attractive. Itís trashy. Itís not well taken care of,Ē he said.

Marty Tennant

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Re: Tim Tilley. Rich, white, arrogant
« Reply #1 on: November 28, 2020, 10:37:53 AM »
Full quote:

"The project got support from Tim Tilley, a former chairman of the Economic Development Alliance and owner of a manufacturing firm in Georgetown. He said there is a need for the rental housing that Graycliff proposes.

ďNobodyís going to live in Georgetown. Iím sorry, but itís not attractive. Itís trashy. Itís not well taken care of,Ē he said.

After listening to the opponents, Tilley said, ďthis is crazy. These people are just selfish. They moved here from somewhere else. They donít want anyone else to live here. They want it to stay exactly like it is because they made their career and livelihood elsewhere, not in Georgetown County.Ē"

Source: https://coastalobserver.com/0-to-182-units-commission-says-no-5-0/
Notice:  All posts made by me are my OPINION.  I am not responsible for any comments by others!  The Citizens' Report is provided as a public service to the citizens of Georgetown County for them to report and comment on the news.

Surfer

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Re: Tim Tilley. Rich, white, arrogant
« Reply #2 on: November 28, 2020, 07:21:35 PM »
Seems Tim Tilley is talking from both sides of his mouth on this issue. He's quoted as saying, in a December 2016 Post and Courier article that his (then planned) manufacturing expansion would be more than doubling his workforce, by adding "...100 new employees (as) sales managers, welders, pipe fitters, industrial electronics technicians and engineers..." Does he think those employees are going to want to live in the "trashy" Georgetown he is 'diss'ing now, or will those well-paid professionals and journey(wo)men want to go to opportunities elsewhere, where they can have careers and incomes and housing in cities and towns more "desirable" than his town, Georgetown? Seems he's not only rich, white and arrogant, but also elitist. I realize he can't do anything about the second one, but the others are under his current control. Wake up and smell the Paper Mill, Mr. Tim! 

Tom Rubillo

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Re: Tim Tilley. Rich, white, arrogant
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2020, 05:42:04 PM »
When a major investor in the city makes a negative comment about where he is putting his money, perhaps it is a better idea to listen to what he has said and decide whether he has a point or not.  That is, I believe, a preferable response to simply reacting emotionally and (forgive the repetitiveness of the expression) being critical of the critique.  As I understand the thrust of what this gentleman is saying, the city "looks shabby" and, therefore, newcomers might not want to live in the city limits.  Ironically, this  prediction certainly seems to proved to have been true recently when the new city administrator chose to live outside the city in Wedgefield rather than invest in one of the numerous houses for sale inside the city.

Be all of that as it may, the truth of the matter is that the city does "look shabby."  Grass is growing unhindered through cracks in the sidewalks and along the curbs of all of the major arteries of the city.  This otherwise easily remedied eyesore gives visitors, newcomers, all comers like me and investors a subtle yet negative impression that no one at the Streets Department (whose mission is, in important and fundamental part, to keep the city looking clean and well taken care of) really gives a damn for much of anything but receiving a reliable paycheck.  It is my understanding that the mayor has complained about this unsightly state of affair many times to the city staff with responsibility for keeping the streets clean and neat, only to encounter passive resistance.  Trouble is, in truth, that the mayor is too nice a guy.  I, for one, would not tolerate department supervisors who didn't follow instructions.   

Shabby sidewalks in Maryville, along the Andrews Highway, Merriman Road, North and South Fraser and elsewhere aside, there is yet another festering problem that makes the city look "shabby."  It is the seemingly ever growing number of abandoned, vacant and otherwise deteriorating buildings and overgrown lots all around the city.  The ugly and unkept Ports Authority and ugly (but, to its credit, manicured shrubbery notwithstanding) steel mill properties aside, there is a line of long vacant and crumbling buildings on the opposite side of the street from steel mill that, at various times, have been open for use by vagrants and hitchhikers as a temporary haven.  The same is true of the long abandoned "Green Construction Co." building across Prince Street from the now collapsed old city hall.  The now vacant car dealership, the always unsightly "Potter's Field" in the very heart of the city, the abandoned Andrews Bank and Trust Building in that same block, the long unused Winyah HS gym, shanties along Bonds Street behind Tony's Famous Pizza, the overgrown lots along Merriman Road near Winyah (with a crumbling wooden structure hidden inside), the old Playboy Gardens that hasn't been in use for years on North Merriman (which diminishes the property values of the Habitat for Humanity homes all around it) are just a few examples.

I am of the firm belief that these sorts of conditions cannot exist without either the indifference or incompetence (or both) of well paid city employees and officials with responsibility for code enforcement.  State laws and local ordinance exist and are sufficient to correct these sorts of problems.  Building an fire inspectors can cite the owners of these properties for violations of fire and building codes.  There is a perfectly legal procedure to force property owners to abate these nuisances.  As they exist now, these buildings are all potential breeding grounds for rats, snakes and other vermon, attractive but dangerous venues for children at play, potential crime scenes, and structures that diminish the attractiveness and value of surrounding properties.  They should all be inspected, cited for code violations, condemned and torn down in my opinion.  Bot state law and local ordinances allow the city to charge the cost of enforcement back to any property owner that does not cooperate.  (Ironic, isn't it, state and local law work much like federal Superfund law in this same way.)

I wrote a lengthy letter to the city administrator when she came on board about this problem, detailing, step by step, how to address it.  I even volunteered to amass the information, coordinate inspections, send out letters and legal notices and assist the city attorney in any way necessary to address this festering problem. I heard nothing beyond a curt and dismissive response that most of the information that I said could be dug up at the courthouse about these properties was already available on-line.  Who knew?  Who cares?  Information, no matter how readily accessible, means nothing if it is not put to use. 

I'm not looking for a job.  I'm too old for that.  But I do think that the criticism about Georgetown looking "shabby" is well placed.  I've lived here for 42+ years.  That's longer than the average South Carolinian has been alive.  I know my way around the block.  I know the law.  I understand politics.  I speak my mind freely and openly.  I don't hide behind pseudonyms or initials.  I don't have knee jerk reactions.  Those are for jerks. 

I like the mayor.  I think he does a real good job.  He persuaded the steel mill to tear down half of that old rusting plant.  He persuaded the steel mill to take care of the shrubbery along Fraser Street next to the mill.  But he needs help.  The administrator, the department heads and the city employees have to step up to the plate and do their jobs.  They are all well paid.  They all have good employee benefits.  They have job security/  They have all these things at the expense of the residents of the city.  For this "fair day's pay" they owe city residents a "fair day's work."  An important part of that work has to do with slum abatement -- code enforcement aimed at making the community clean, safe and habitable for everyone, rich and poor, young and old, black and white, Democrat and Republican and everyone anywhere in between. 

Georgetown looks "shabby."  That's the truth of the matter.  It doesn't have to be that way.  My open advice to our good mayor Brendon Barber is this:  Stop being a nice guy.  Kick what butts you have to in order to get city workers to do their work.  You'll get re-elected easily if you do.  If not, you have competition for the job, if, indeed, you think it is worth keeping.   

TimArmstrong

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Re: Tim Tilley. Rich, white, arrogant
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2020, 10:24:08 AM »
Any idea as to why you got pushback/dismissive-response from the new administrator?

Tom Rubillo

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Re: Tim Tilley. Rich, white, arrogant
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2020, 01:52:12 PM »
Haven't heard it, but my guess would be hypersensitivity to anything that sounds like criticism.  If so, too damned bad.  It is the responsibility to the residents of the community that is important, not the fragile egos of those receiving reliable and generous paychecks, good benefits and a comfortable life at the expense of local residents.  Georgetown has what is called the "strong mayor" form of government.  By state law, ultimate responsibility for the quality of performance all of the day-to-day work of municipal workers is vested in the hands of mayor.  The mayor issues all of the marching orders, calls the cadence and makes sure that everyone marches in step to the marching orders.  When it comes to job performance, there are no "different drummers" allowed.  The administrator's job is to "assist the mayor" in the performance of the mayor's duties--to do as he or she is instructed by the mayor. That's the law.  That's the proper order of things.  If the citizens of Georgetown want to change any of that and clip the wings of their elected leader, they can do so by voting to change the form of government.  Unless and until the voters do that, the mayor is totally accountable for the performance of all city workers.

Having grown up in a community that was declared to be a slum and "redeveloped" by government action, I know for a fact that abandoned and substandard buildings, the accumulation of litter. weeds. grass and other debris cannot exist without the indifference, incompetence, and sometimes even the corruption of those with responsibility for conducting audits, inspections, oversight and enforcement of the law.  That doesn't just involve the cops and criminal law.  It involves building codes, fire codes, sanitation codes, and a whole host of other local and state laws designed to protect the health, safety, welfare and growth of local communities.  Georgetown has a bunch of them.  They are more than adequate to the task.  Regrettably, those the mayor (who does a good job) are not as reliable as they need to be.  Also regrettably, the mayor is such a good, decent and nice person that those who work for him take advantage of his good nature.  I'm sorry about that.  But I'm too much of an s.o.b. to tolerate the betrayal of a good mayor by his staff to remain silent about it.

The western entrance to Georgetown has decaying, vacant and unsightly mobile homes rotting along the side of the road.  A short distance away an abandoned old car dealership reinforces the impression that the town is on the decline.  Grass growing along the edges of the roadway between the curb and sidewalk also reinforce that initial impression.  When a visitor from the west arrives at the center of town -- at Potter's Field -- trucks and other vehicles are parked haphazardly all around that burial ground.  An abandoned bank building and old, unused high school gym greets then next if they head into the hysterical district.  Those coming from the south across Rosen Bridge see an otherwise beautiful vista marred by an array of abandoned, unkept and dilapidated buildings and domes at the edges of the Ports Authority property.  The Port itself is an eyesore that spoils the view.  Just a short distance away, on the left as the motorist heads north, are a number of abandoned and sometimes boarded up buildings that haven't been used in a long time.  While the steel mill is at least making an effort to landscape and put a little lipstick on that pig in a poke that Liberty bought, the sign across the street announcing the presence of "City Hall," quite ironically, sits next to a vacant lot.  Ain't nobody home, so the lights can't be on.  They can't because there ain't no home. 

Really?

So Tim, I don't care if there is "push back" against my candor.  The facts on the ground prove the point being made.  Boo hoos from fragile egos won't change those facts.  Only hard work and competent performance of responsibilities to the residents of Georgetown will do that.

My advice to Brendon Barber is straightforward enough.  Stop worry about being nice, polite or sensitive to the feelings of those collecting comfortable paychecks from the city.  Give them marching orders and insist that they stay in step and do their duty.