Author Topic: Will justice be done at Tara Hall  (Read 389 times)

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PBSIAT

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Will justice be done at Tara Hall
« on: September 01, 2021, 09:42:31 AM »
Why is the Georgetown Times silent on the fraud and stealing at Tara Hall Home for Boys? Jim Dunn is the suspect according to the police for the missing money.

Will this be another "white wash" like all the stolen money Bulleah White stole years ago from her group?

Will the powerful people who sit as elected officials close ranks and protect one of their own?

Will the Georgetown Time even report the news?

We shall see.

JW

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Re: Will justice be done at Tara Hall
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2021, 10:28:59 AM »
You little people do not need to worry about this. The powerful people here in town will deal this. Go back to your pitiful little existance and let the leaders in town deal with this.

Tom Rubillo

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Re: Will justice be done at Tara Hall
« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2021, 01:28:45 PM »
In America we presume innocence unless or until guilt is proven beyond a reasonable doubt by competent evidence.  Under Shira law, they do the opposite--the accused has to prove his innocence.  Which system of justice do you prefer PBSIAT and JW, both in this instance and, heaven forbid, someone accuses you of doing something against the law?

PBSIAT

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Re: Will justice be done at Tara Hall
« Reply #3 on: September 08, 2021, 09:47:16 AM »
We now have a statement from Jim Dumm. He felt compelled to answer the people demanding answers.

Here is the statement Dumm read at the start of Tuesday’s school board meeting:
In July of 2020, my computer at Tara Hall was hacked. And, unknowingly, at the same time myself and Tara Hall became victims of a highly sophisticated financial scam.
Once I realized the directions I had been receiving were fraudulent, I informed my board of trustees. I will be cooperating with subsequent investigations.
There are no allegations of embezzlement whatsoever. And, I did not intentionally violate any laws.
This matter does not involve the school district in any way whatsoever. It does not impact my ability to fulfill my responsibilities as a school board member.
Thank you very much.

He realized the directions he received were fraudulent? But he did not intentionally violate any laws? He admits he participated in the fraud but he is not guilty? Look for Mr. Dumm to admit himself into rehab soon to be treated for something?

Maybe Mr. Rubillo can explain how participating in a fraud can be considered as not breaking laws?

Tom Rubillo

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Re: Will justice be done at Tara Hall
« Reply #4 on: September 08, 2021, 06:00:43 PM »
Fraud is a "specific intent" version of larceny.  To convict a person of "fraud," there must be competent and admissible evidence showing that the accused intended to stealing money or some other thing of value and that they weren't simply duped.  A current example involves Donald Trump and the Trump Organization.  There are accusations being investigated by the New York City District Attorney that there was a tax fraud involving, among other things, perks (an apartment, a fancy car, etc.) being made available to executives for which income taxes were not paid ("perks" like this are taxable income).  To convict Donald Trump of "fraud" in this instance, in addition to failure to report these "perks" to taxing authorities, the District Attorney will have to prove, by competent and admissible evidence, that Donald Trump "intended" to avoid payment of taxes.  His obvious defense will be that this entire scheme was hatched by his Chief Financial Officer without Trump's knowledge or approval and that he only signed the tax return when it was put in front of him.  He will say he never read it and did not "intend" to defraud the government.  That defense is an obvious and plausible explanation which will likely raise "reasonable doubt" in the mind of at least one juror.  That's all that's necessary -- "reasonable doubt."  The defendant doesn't have to prove his innocence.  He only needs to establish "reasonable doubt" in the mind of one juror.

Richard Nixon was alleged to have cheated on his income taxes.  He said the tax return has been prepared by an accountant.  Nixon said he never read it before he signed it.  He was not prosecuted for tax fraud.

The American system of justice has evolved over nearly a thousand years -- ever since William the Conqueror took over the British Isles. The rules and procedures and standards are not "technicalities," but have all been carefully thought out in order to ensure that people who are accused or suspected of wrongdoing are treated fairly.  Rushes to judgment or "shooting first and asking questions later" or "kicking asses, taking names and throwing those grabbed up to the wolves" are the stuff of Shira law and totalitarian states, not part of America's system of justice. No lynching.  No appeasement of the emotions of bystanders or gossips or nosy people who take pleasure in the troubles of others.  Law is for grown ups, not mobs carrying torches. 

God bless America.  God bless Constitutional government.  God bless the rule of law.  If, at some point in time, you, PBSIAT and/or JW and/or anybody else who reads Citizens Report are ever accused of doing something wrong, you'll appreciate the protections offered by the law.

JW

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Re: Will justice be done at Tara Hall
« Reply #5 on: September 09, 2021, 12:57:31 PM »
I know enough how Georgetown works to know that you can be innocent but the powerful people can still have you arrested and convicted if they want to. The wheels of justice in this town will let the connected people off all day long no matter what crime you commit. Just ask Bulleah White.

That's why I keep my nose clean and stay away from the powerful people around here.

And yes God Bless this country. We need him now more than ever.